DRESSING THE CITY UND MEIN KOPF IST EIN HEMD

City Intervention from the cycle URBAN-CITY-URBAN by Angie Hiesl and
Roland Kaiser

World premiere Cologne:
25 August 2011 | Ebertplatz and surroundings | 5 pm
Further Interventions in Cologne:
26 August 2011 | Heinrich-Böll-Platz | 4 pm
27 August 2011 | Ebertplatz and surroundings | 5 pm
1 | 2 September 2011 | Heinrich-Böll-Platz | 4 pm
3 September 2011 | Ebertplatz and surroundings | 5 pm

Entrance free! All Interventions last about 90 to 120 minutes

In the event of rain, interventions may start later or be postponed to another day.
Information Hotline 01578-894.24.38 or visit www.angiehiesl.de

Alternative dates: 8 | 10 September 2011



DRESSING THE CITY AND MY HEAD IS A SHIRT is the latest production by performance artists Angie Hiesl + Roland Kaiser and the second part of URBAN-CITY-URBAN – a project cycle spanning several years. While the opening project PICK’n’PLACE (2010) employed shelving systems and everyday objects as a means of probing the systems that underpin our social order and our way of life, in DRESSING THE CITY AND MY HEAD IS A SHIRT this latest performance project focuses on the relationship between people, clothes and urban space.

Clothes are our second skin, the membrane between our body and the environment. They are the link between our inner and outer worlds and make a public statement. Clothing is a non-verbal means of communication and delivers signals that relate directly to our social role. The issue of clothes and all their associations – whether social, cultural, aesthetic, historic, religious or moral – leads directly to Hiesl and Kaiser’s original form of expression: the provocation of our senses in public space.

Amid the hubbub of daily city life, ten dancers and performers from seven countries will intervene on two distinctive squares in Cologne. In the ensuing dialogue with the local surroundings, their bodies and hundreds of items of all sorts of clothing, bizarre, abstract images emerge. Hovering between fragility and vitality, the actors interlace themselves with their surroundings and install themselves in the public space. Their bodies, the fabric of their clothes and the city architecture can no longer be clearly separated from one another. Familiar patterns of perception cease to apply.

The artistic power of this intimate performance installation lies in the physical limitations and limitlessness, in the playful transposition of reality, and in the transparent “self-enmeshment” of individuals, architecture and daily life.

URBAN-CITY-URBAN comprises project modules with different artistic approaches: Performance projects / Improvised interventions / Performance lectures. The projects are conceived as an inter - disciplinary work. They deal with urban development and structural change and with the effect of performance / installation art on public space and vice versa. The performers are selected from the spheres of dance, theatre, performance, music and science as well as from other professional areas and walks of life. The projects take place outdoors as site-specific work in public urban space.

Supported by: Stadt Köln, Kunststiftung NRW, Ministerium für Familie, Kinder, Jugend, Kultur und Sport des Landes Nordrhein-Westfalen
Media partner: Choices

Performers
Armin Biermann - Germany
Bernardo Fallas - Costa Rica
Ziv Frenkel - Israel
Chih-Ying Ku-Gebert - Taiwan
Yuta Hamaguchi - Japan
Mack Kubicki - Germany
Helena Miko - Germany
Aoi Nakamura - Japan
Ursula Nill - Switzerland
Alfredo Zinola – Italy

Team
Concept and realisation: Angie Hiesl + Roland Kaiser
Costumes: Sabine Kreiter
Technical support: Andy Semmler
Organization: Astrid Lutz, Carina Schorn
Press and public relations: Andrea Stilper
Documentation/Photo: Roland Kaiser
Legal advice: Reinhard Bergmann
Translation: Vivien Smith
Graphic design: Steffen Missmahl
Volunteer: Sarah Hildebrand
Overall management: Angie Hiesl + Roland Kaiser

DRESSING THE CITY AND MY HEAD IS A SHIRT is a project by Angie Hiesl Produktion

Video-Clip - Cologne, Ebertplatz / Germany - 2011




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